Effective Sales Management Performance

Many managers shy away when having to deal with performance issues. My approach says "bring it on." I believe that non-performing players need to get their act together or there is no place for them on the team. Here are a few considerations when addressing sales performance issues.

Opportunity Cost: What happens when one of your salespeople is not performing? Companies have set up a process for addressing performance issues. Some of these processes can take 3 -6 months to determine whether the sales rep can address their performance gaps or if not, are fired.

You can get more information about sales management performance at https://www.halifax-consulting.com/.

When addressing a rep's performance, sales managers will use formal Performance Improvement Programs (PIP). These are formal procedural documents used to demonstrate that the manager is serious about a rep's poor performance. The manager's task is to document areas that require improvement if the rep is going to remain on the team.

Managing a PIP is time-consuming and stressful. Much of the documentation is in the manager's hands and of course, there is added tension between the sales rep and manager. This results in strained communication and mutual lack of trust.

Focusing on a non-performing sales rep diverts a sales manager's time from important activities, such as coaching reps with greater potential. Many sales managers do their best to be fair and give the rep a chance to prove themselves. They give the rep the benefit of the doubt and allow the PIP to drag on. We all know the opportunity cost in terms of lost sales as well as additional management time spent on the individual. As a rule, do not allow a PIP to linger for more than 3 months. Either the rep can perform or it's time to part ways.

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